NEVER give up searching!

My 3rd great grandfather, William L. Peters, died 6 Feb 1887 in Pickaway County, Ohio, but his death record had long eluded being found in popular online resources.  I learned that it became an Ohio statewide law to record deaths in 1867 and that each county’s probate court was responsible for recording the death as a single line entry in a register between 1867-1908. Deaths that occurred after December 19, 1908 are recorded by the Ohio Department of Health in a certificate format.¹  So, William’s death should have been recorded at the courthouse.  I wrote to the probate clerk to see if it was there.  In February, I received an email and was told it was not there.  How depressing.

William’s relapse as published in the 21 Jan 1887 edition of the Circleville Democrat and Watchman.

Still, it bugged me and sat in the back of my mind for months.  I knew it just had to exist!  I had found multiple news articles online detailing his sickness, the doctor being called in from another bigger city, and his sons being called to his side in his final days.  I even found his obituary but I desperately wanted his actual death record in hopes that it would give me more clues to solving where the Peters originated from. 

Seaman’s Protection Papers

Click to enlarge.

Have you found a seafaring person in your tree?  Then you should definitely check out what I consider one of the best records out there and one of my personal favorites!  They are just so very fascinating.

The Citizenship Affidavits of US-born Seaman at Select Ports, or Seaman’s Protection Papers as they’re sometimes known, were issued starting in the early 1800’s as a way to protect US sailors from being “pressed” into service on British ships.  Think of it like a passport type of identification… applicants would go to a local official and have their identity verified. This usually included either bringing an person with you who knew you or providing signed affidavits from witnesses who attested to your identity and proof of citizenship or a notarized affidavit of such.

Family Wedding – Day 5 of #30DayFHWChallenge

Grandpa Glenn Archer "Archie" Stewart and grandchildren, Taylor and Noah Garnes. 30 April 2005

Grandpa Glenn Archer “Archie” Stewart and grandchildren, Taylor and Noah. 30 April 2005

The prompt for day 5 of the #30DayFHWChallenge is to select your favorite family photo, and write about the moments just before and/or after the photo was taken. Why was it taken? Was your ancestor happy to be in it?

This is a weird/hard one for me because as I’m not close with my mom’s side of the family, I don’t have very many pictures of them.  As children though, we did most of our family type events with that side of the family so while there are many, many pictures of us at family events, I don’t have access to them. But before I became estranged from that side, I was lucky enough that my mother gave me a few pictures so I do have “some” from my childhood remaining. Maybe someday she’ll pass them on but who knows? I have what I have and I cherish them.