Clark Children Reunite After 42 Years

Charles Lloyd Moore

A while ago, I wrote about my husband’s great-grandfather’s story about being sold at the Ohio State Fair and how he changed his name from Clark to Moore.  A Clark relative reached out to us recently on Ancestry to find out more information because we had so many matching names in our trees.  She was a grand-daughter to Cecil Benjamin Clark, brother to my husband’s great-grandfather, Charles Lloyd Moore.  I sent her a packet of papers and pictures along with giving her links to this blog.  However, in giving her links to here, I realized that I hadn’t updated my blog with the discoveries I’d make in the Clark/Moore line.  So here we are with an update to tell their tale…

My New Heirloom

Clara Lou Peters and Archie Stewart on their wedding day.

My mom sent me a picture of my grandma Clara Lou Peters Stewart on her wedding day recently.  It reminded me that she showed me her wedding dress once when I was little.  I’m not sure why she had it out specifically but it was in a big yellowing box and when she pulled it out, I remember thinking how lovely it still was and how much I’d love to wear it some day.  I never did get to wear it; my first impromptu wedding dress was a bright pink dress I’d worn to homecoming and at my second wedding, I wore a black lace number.

I had been thinking for a very long time about doing something with my wedding dress.  Not only was a black Gothic wedding dress totally unique at the time fifteen years ago but I also had hand sewn my own black veil trimmed in the sweetest black crochet trim.  It took me weeks to finish.  My dress, being delicate lace, had ripped during one of our military moves and so it hung in my closet for years now staring me in the face, unable to be worn any longer but being too sentimental to toss out either. 

My Wedding Flower Heirloom

Our wedding day in 2002.

Flowers and weddings have been on my mind quite a lot here lately.  My daughter is in the midst of finalizing her wedding details for October and my own anniversary passed just last week.  Fifteen years ago, I carried the most beautiful bouquet of white roses at my wedding.  Today, even though the preservation process made them a creamy, near pink color, they hang on my wall in a special preservation “bubble” frame where I admire them every day when I walk by.  They serve as a wonderful, constant reminder of my wedding day.

Boys! Boys! Boys!

Awhile ago I wrote about the story in my husband’s family about their one great grandfather being “sold” at the Ohio State Fair to a farmer down near the southern Ohio border.  Turns out, that this very thing, however unbelievable and far fetched, is absolutely, 100% true.

I reached out on a whim to the Ohio State Fair administration office and they answered within 24 hours.  The Ohio State Fair has a historian named C. LaVon Shook and he wrote a book entitled A History of the Ohio State Fair in which he documents the Children’s Home Society offering “on the spot” adoptions of children.  There was even an article in the Columbus Dispatch!  (see below!)

History-of-the-OSF-by-LaVon-Shook

Excerpt from C. LaVon Shook’s “A History of the Ohio State Fair”

A Little Advice, Please

Who-are-youI need some advice from long time genealogists out there with an exceptionally “odd” set of circumstances that I’m investigating and I’ve hit a weird roadblock and have no idea where to proceed from here.  We all have strange tales we come across in our genealogy hunts but this one is particularly twisty and difficult to investigate.  So I’m calling on you all for help, guidance and advice.

There has been a long standing story in my husband’s family that they were actually “Clarks” instead of Moores but he didn’t have any real verification of this.  When I began doing his tree, this was of course, one of the first things I looked into just to see if he was right.  He was, must to my surprise!